Carwyn Moore on the Future of Software Development

Carwyn Moore is our Head of Software Development, hailing from Hawera in the beautiful Taranaki.

We’re lucky to have had Carwyn on the team for 9 years now, after he joined us as a Developer back in 2011.

 

Where it all began…

Carwyn has always had an affinity for software – so much so that he started to learn to code at just 7 years old (self-taught, of course). After high school he went on to study Software Engineering at the Central Institute of Technology in Upper Hutt.

His big break came at his first tech job - on the Help Desk at the ISP paradise.net – where he progressed from answering calls less and less… to coding more and more!

He then become contracted to work as a developer on other projects outside the company. Notably, he was contracted at MPI (previously called MAF) for a number of years, developing software to support the export industry and learning from some of the best minds in the New Zealand software industry.

Fast forward 7 years, when Mark Wakefield, our SRE, approached Carwyn asking if he knew of any developers looking for jobs. He put his hand up right away, keen on a new challenge with a growing NZ success story.

And the rest is history!

Carwyn says one of the aspects he loves most about working at Modica Group is the “flexibility to work with a modern tech stack” and “the people I work closely with day-to-day”.

 

So where does Carwyn think software is headed in the next few years?

He gives us some insights…

 

Getting back in fashion

Carwyn says that “everything in tech cycles back on itself” i.e. “Old is the new new”.

Ideas that went out of fashion (or were before their time) always seem to come back again - particularly in the world of software. But they come back in a new way that makes them even better and more relevant.

Ideas such as LowCode/NoCode tooling, which as it makes a comeback “will empower Knowledge Workers to self-service their own workflows” says Carwyn.

 

Education Tools, AI  Data is where it’s at

The education industry is having a difficult time keeping up with the rate of change in technology and the supply of developers needed, so Carwyn says that self-taught developers will become even more prevalent. Fortunately, the barrier to entry will be lower as the tools are improved over time, too.

Last but not least, Carwyn says that AI and Data will also continue to rise and become even more critical to businesses.

We’re looking forward to seeing what the future holds for software and tech in general, especially with Carwyn at the head of the helm.